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Starleaton's PacPrint Fundraiser Now Saves Lives

 

Starleaton’s long-standing support of the Humpty Dumpty Foundation has received a boost following the PacPrint ‘dollar-for-dollar’ fundraiser, with the donated funds buying a vital item of emergency care for children at the busy emergency department of a Nursing Post located on Rottnest Island WA and part of Fremantle Hospital’s network. The island is hugely popular as an activity holiday destination for families who can now feel safer that, in the event of a medical emergency, their children will receive almost immediate introduction of vital fluids directly into the bone cavity rather than hunting for tiny veins for IV intubation.

Known as the EZ-I0 Drill and Educator kit, it is an essential piece of resuscitation equipment used to gain vascular access in critically ill children and babies when intravenous access cannot be established. The drill kit is used to place a needle into the bone cavity within 10 seconds, through which life-saving medication and fluids can then be administered. Achieving vascular access is vital to the resuscitation process and has life-saving consequences. The kit also comes with training devices used for staff education and practice of this vital procedure.

The equipment will carry a plaque ‘Generously donated by Starleaton.’ CEO Ben Eaton says: “I’d like to thank all of our customers who donated at our Humpty Dumpty lemonade booth during PacPrint; it is their generosity that enabled us to match the amount raised to buy this piece of essential paedeatric emergency care.”

The Humpty Dumpty Foundation specialises in placing essential and often life-saving medical equipment in Paediatric Wards, Neonatal Units, Maternity and Emergency Departments in over 340 hospitals Australia-wide. Paul Francis OAM, Humpty Dumpty Foundation Founder and Executive Chairman, says: “This generous support of the Humpty Dumpty Foundation and the local community is immeasurable. It means children on Rottnest Island and surrounding areas have access to medical equipment that is very much needed by the medical staff and, most of all, it is life-saving.”

 
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